About bronwyn angela white

creative writer quirky knitter poet and liturgist jewellery maker

“Rainbow Trinity” in Q-Spirit blog

I’m thrilled that Kittredge Cherry has included one of my prayers in her blog about “Trinity,” the last image in Doug Blanchard’s gay Passion of Christ series: Trinity Sunday: Holy Spirit blesses same-sex couple as Gay Passion of Christ series ends.

You can find “Rainbow Trinity” and other inclusive, progressive liturgical writing on this website. You might also enjoy the prayer I wrote for Transgender Remembrance Day.

While you’re here, check out the music by Amanda Udis-Kessler written especially for my hymn, “Faith of Metaphor and Mystery” which has a version for same-sex and mixed raced weddings.

You can download the score and recording (free) from Amanda’s Queer Sacred music website.


Kittredge Cherry, founder at Q Spirit is a lesbian Christian author who writes regularly about LGBTQ spirituality. She holds degrees in religion, journalism and art history. She was ordained by Metropolitan Community Churches and served as its national ecumenical officer, advocating for LGBTQ rights at the National Council of Churches and World Council of Churches.

photographs © Bronwyn Angela White

New music for contemporary hymn lyrics

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An exciting new collaboration!

You can now download (free) the music score of hymn, “Faith of Metaphor and Mystery“, with brand new music written by Amanda Udis-Kessler, from my http://www.spiritandfaithwords.com website.

You can also download an MP3 recording sung by Ken Janzen from Amanda’s site, Queer Sacred Music.

Capture

Out of season

These hymn lyrics have been lurking around the edge of my consciousness for a while, never quite satisfactory, nowhere near complete. Then, of a sudden, the spark of a ‘completing’ idea arrived and this simple hymn is the result.

It flows from my years of living in Wellington, the capital city of Aotearoa New Zealand, where I still travel to – an hour by train from Kapiti Coast – to attend my faith community, and see the doctor, dentist and optician I’ve been with for decades!

There’s a local saying, “You can’t beat Wellington on a good day!” This hymn celebrates that simple gift, and our place as city dwellers.

Our city in the spring – hymn lyrics

If you enjoy this, you might also like “Botanic Garden Prayers“.

Liturgy in a time of isolation

Are you missing your faith community?

Do you wish you could find some progressive, inclusive, contemporary liturgy while you can’t get to your regular church service?

This time of government or self-imposed isolation is ideal for polishing off those projects we’ve had in mind for a while: stash-busting for crafters, jigsaw-making for puzzlers, housework for procrastinators…

As we’re in the season of Lent, coming up to Easter, I’ve recorded myself reading some Easter-themed liturgy resources: prayers, poems, reflections, hymn lyrics. I’m not a professional video maker or worship leader, and they’re not the smoothest audio visuals in the YouTuberverse, but I hope you’ll enjoy and be inspired by them.

Here’s a link to my Easter – Passiontide – Liturgy playlist on YouTube.

You might even decide to buy one of my books, so you can read the resources in your own time. Blessings, and peace be with you in this strange Passiontide, as we face a suddenly ambivalent future.

Here are links to other progressive, inclusive, online resources:

St Andrew’s on The Terrace, Wellington

St Michael’s Uniting Church, Melbourne

Durham Street Methodist Church, Christchurch

Winter is coming… and spring, summer & autumn – but not just yet

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After a year largely spent with family or working on art+craft projects for various exhibitions (yes, thank you, I’ve managed to sell quite a few items of jewellery, knitting and stitched fibre art), I’ve finally begun compiling the next book in my #Spirit and Faith series.

My plan was to follow both calendar and liturgical years, including liturgical resources suitable for Summer and Advent, Autumn and Passiontide, Winter and Pentecost, Spring and Season of Creation. 60 pages in, and I’m only up to Easter!

What a problem: I’ve got too much material. I’ll have to spread it over two books: one liturgical and one seasonal – or to put it another way, a collection for “high and holy days,” and another for “ordinary time”. Which should I work on first?

in the wake of racist terror attack

Here are my ongoing responses so far:

Prayers of the people following the Christchurch mosque attack; parable of lost son & prodigal father

An evolving response… Christchurch, Friday 15 March 2019 – part 1, a prose poem that asks some awkward questions

An evolving response… – part 2, some ideas for counteracting racism and intolerance early.

 

Aroha mai.jpg

 

Just in time for Advent and Christmas: “Something new to say”

Just in time for planning your Advent and Christmas services: Liturgical resources for Advent, Christmas and the New Year (including Epiphany).

Where to buy:
Softcover available direct from Bronwyn, or purchase from Philip Garside Publishing.
Kindle edition on Amazon


Something new to say + You who delight me: $35.00 + p&p

Buy direct from Bronwyn during September 2018 (delivery in October), for $20.00 plus postage. Combine it with the purchase of “You who delight me” for the discount “bundle” price of only $15.00: two books for $35.00 plus p&p.

The third book in Bronwyn’s “Words of spirit and faith” series is in the planning stages, for publication in 2019.

 

Two Epiphany Reflections

I’ve added two Reflections on Epiphany (one of them also includes Jesus’ Baptism). You’ll notice they share the same introductory paragraphs, but differ in the bodies of the reflection:

Gifts for a Baptism

Memory and Mystery

Did wise women visit Jesus?

Memory and Mystery: a reflection for Epiphany

Extract: Dominican Fr. Benedict Thomas Viviano, an authority on the Gospel of Matthew, believes it’s entirely possible that women could have been among the mages in his birth narrative. Matthew is the only Gospel that says anything about them, and his use of the Greek masculine plural magoi for magi can be used inclusively, just as the English word “men” often includes women.

Viviano specializes in examining the book of Matthew in light of its literary connections to the Hebrew Bible. Even though Matthew 1-2 is not strictly a Midrash—since it is not about the Old Testament—it “employs Midrashic techniques” to interpret the person of Jesus. He relates “the presence of one or more women among the magi [to] the background story of the queen of Sheba, with her quest for Israelite royal wisdom, her reverent awe, and her three gifts fit for a king.”